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Breakfast Panel: Doctors and Patients Bridging the Digital Divide

Greetings readers!  This week I’m excited to say that I have been invited to participate as part of a breakfast panel for National Health IT Week at the W Hotel in Washington, DC.  The title of the panel will be Doctors and Patients Bridging the Digital Divide and it will be taking place on Tuesday morning, Sept 11, at 8:30 – 10:00 AM.  This breakfast panel is being sponsored by Practice Fusion, and registration is in the form of donations to the Society for Participatory Medicine.  From their website, the main topics for discussion are:

What doctors can do to maximize the potential of technology to improve care,

What workflows and techniques providers can implement to enhance their relationships with patients,

How providers can inspire patients to take an active role in their health management through health IT, and

Which policies and industry innovations can facilitate better patient-provider relationships and value-based care.

An old mentor of mine once gave me wise advice. “Whatever you do, make it count twice.” In other words, if, for example you are preparing a talk, the opportunity may arise later to turn this into a paper/manuscript that you can submit to a journal. Perhaps you can even give a version of the talk as recycled talk at another conference for slightly different purpose. In other words, be efficient!  Turn a dollar into two… or even more.

Therefore, I’d like to share with you some of the ideas that are coming to me as I proceed towards the panel on Tuesday.

What can doctors do to maximize the potential of technology to improve care?  Well, first off, we can simply use it.  Far too many doctors are still using paper records.  My advice would be to get off of paper records and forge ahead into the New World of electronic records, which is quickly becoming not such a new world anymore. This is becoming more and more the standard and will continue to do so in the future. Secondly, I would highly encourage any medical provider out there to use a web-based system as opposed to an older, in-office server-based system. This allows more opportunity to use the technology outside of the office, particularly on mobile devices. Thus, there’s more opportunity for portability and accessibility. I can’t tell you how many times I have been at home or out of town on the weekend or in another country for a few day, and this technology becomes invaluable in allowing me to continue to provide healthcare to my many patients. This can come in the form of prescription refills and communications to patients by messaging my staff to give them a call back. If my patient portal allowed it, which it currently does not, I could even securely message my patients regarding any issues they may be currently having.

Regarding workflows and techniques providers can implement to enhance relationships with patients, I advise turning the computer monitor during office visits to show patiences test results, especially images, more clearly. This will give them the opportunity to ask questions and see firsthand things that might inspire them to be more interested in asking questions. Hence, the visit becomes more of a two-way interaction rather than simply the doctor preaching from on high the recommendations. At the end of patient visits, I currently offer to enroll them in our personalized health record, PHR, so that they can have access to their test results, upcoming appointment information, and diagnoses. This is a far cry from granting them complete access to all the records, but it is a useful start. Patients absolutely love it and have given me a lot of positive feedback. At future visits, patients are then more likely to request me to turn on access to the latest test results, indicating that they are aware that they have personalized access to their health information.

How can providers inspire patients to take an active role in their health management through health IT? As providers, I think it is imperative that we encourage the mainstream media to develop better marketing strategies. Patients need to value and want this in the first place before it can happen. In the meantime, providers can use electronic medical records with a personal health record component. This will grant patients the opportunity and access to become more interested in their healthcare and get inspired with new ideas for such. We providers should advertise openly to patients that a personal health record is available in our offices. Only through knowledge can power come. Finally, we as providers can discuss opportunities for the use of health IT to manage chronic health issues like high blood pressure and diabetes with patients. Providers admittedly need better knowledge in this area, especially since barriers include the massive volume of health IT apps already out on the market. There’s dizzying display of options which often inspire the providers to just simply turn off the computer and go do something else. I also think we need more public advocates among the provider community, people who truly view this as their mission in life, which most providers arguably do not. They are not trained to have such a mission and they are already very busy with providing good health care to the many patients who need it. Thus, identifying key providers in local communities who have a true passion for developing future use and promotion of health information technology is essential in order to inspire other doctors to jump on the bandwagon.

As far as the “policy and industry innovations that can facilitate better patient-provider relationships and value-based care”, I might have to defer that one to my colleagues who are specially trained in how these things typically develop and mature.  In that vein, I’ll be very interested in what my fellow panelists have to say.  Hope to see you at the conference!

September 10, 2012 I Written By

Dr. West is an endocrinologist in private practice in Washington, DC. He completed fellowship training in Endocrinology and Metabolism at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Dr. West opened The Washington Endocrine Clinic, PLLC in 2009. He can be contacted at doctorwestindc@gmail.com.

Practice Fusion Connect 2011 Afterthoughts

Warning: long blog ahead. So here are my after thoughts about the PF Connect 2011 conference on Saturday.  I’m going to put on the TripAdvisor hat here and attempt to be honest – critically evaluating what I experienced – rather than seeming too overly candy-coating of my favorite EMR company.  After all, I do have some readers now and I’d like to think I’m a bit impartial even though PF will always be a big-time positive player in my book.

The day began with a Veteran’s Day tribute, and opening the conference was a Christian evangelical choir, the SFSU Gospel Gators (who by the way are very good singers), singing two songs.  Although I don’t remember much of the lyrics, they were pretty evangelical, singing about God being great and having God on your side when war at the end of the world comes sounds familiar.  I was a bit confused as to why this was supposed to be a Veteran’s Day tribute.  There were no comments made about soldiers fighting for freedom, etc that I recall.  I know PF is very socially conscious, and so perhaps this was a partner organization focused on social outreach within the local community.  An introductory clue here would have been helpful.

Next up on the list was a short keynote by Ryan Howard, CEO.  As I recall, it was brief – about 10 min – and included statistics for users, patients served, and company growth, which now includes 130,000+ users, 25 million+ patients, and 100+ employees.  He did eventually talk further about current developments at the end of the day in a closing talk, including an iPad mobile app which is arguably the hottest ticket item currently under development and was very cool to see up close.  They have clearly tried to engineer as type-free a UI as possible, including a dictation feature embedded in the app, which got a much-deserved round of applause from the audience.

While I was getting miked up backstage for a panel discussion, my practice manager Ken was watching out front as Dr. Farzad Mostashari gave a short keynote Skyped in from DC.  He discussed in general terms the need for more companies (without endorsing anyone by mentioning names, probably a fair thing) introducing disruptive technologies into the field of health IT but always listening to the little guy on the ground (i.e. providers, doctors, nurses, etc). Unfortunately, his keynote was cut short by Skype-failure and was not able to be finished. And at a tech conference?! LOL. Future hopes and dreams include a backup connection. ☺

My panel followed and spent about 25-30 min focused on the “Evolution of the Doctor’s Office”. Matthew Holt, founder of Health 2.0 and a macroscopic commentator, spoke about what we all seem to suspect, that healthcare is changing and in the future will look differently than the current model. While I appreciated the comments, they left me wanting to know what the actual meat of the changes would be, or at least what he thought they would be. For my part, I had a small amount of time to get into a little of what we are doing in my office, but didn’t have time to go the whole nine yards. I talked about being paperless and what that has allowed us to save and do with our spare space and extra money saved, as well as how starved for a technology-oriented doctor the general public actually is. I also briefly touched on the HR changes that an electronic medical office will necessitate if done properly – mainly a work force that necessitates high-level computer skills and a higher baseline education. I’m excited to say that more on this “tech HR” topic will come in a separate guest blog by my practice manager, Ken Harrington, soon! A third panelist was Edwin Miller, VP of Product Management about developing a good EMR product at PF, but I don’t recall much of the specifics. I think they may have been very general.  I’ve met and had dinner with Edwin before, so this is not a cut in any way.  I was probably so excited in participating on stage that my mind was elsewhere by that time.  Great future resolution coming to mind!

From the printed agenda for the entire day, I counted up that they managed to squeeze in about 17 other mini-sessions ranging from 5-20 mins in length. Overall, the movement kept going along, and there wasn’t much time for falling asleep, but because the sessions were relatively short it was difficulty to go beyond a TEDMED level of superficial discussion. I left feeling that I was glad I went, and would go again, but somehow had a longing for more depth. One of the doctors, a psychiatrist from New York I think, said maybe about a single sentence or two on the panel that he was speaking on. But glad to hear he was also not participating in Meaningful Use – just like yours truly! – but still using an EMR to keep neat and efficient patient charts. I’m not nuts after all! (Or at least not the only one.) Overall, I was left asking if too much was just crammed into too little a time space? I am hoping they will conduct parallel break out tracks/sessions next year, so more time can be spent on meatier levels of conversation. I bet I could talk and take questions for a whole 30+ min to providers on the specifics of how we work in my practice. We’ve already done so much that it would seem a shame to let that info go to waste. Nonetheless, I’m going to blog over the next several weeks on what I had planned to but didn’t have time to speak about at Connect 2011. At the end of the day, I know that docs are starving for info on what they can do right now in their own office to be more digital.

In closing, seeing Practice Fusion’s astronomical growth and upward trajectory has been truly inspirational to me as a small office doc with dreams of building a larger future. As we open up and take over the doctor’s office next to our current space – nearly doubling our square footage – and anticipate bringing on 1-2 additional providers in the next 1-2 years, I look forward to growing alongside a great EMR company like Practice Fusion. It will be great to see them at PF Connect 2012, as I’m sure that everything will continue to go right.  Congratulations guys!

Dr. West is an endocrinologist in private practice in Washington, DC.  He completed fellowship training in Endocrinology and Metabolism at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and opened The Washington Endocrine Clinic, PLLC, as a solo practice in 2009.  He can be reached at doctorwestindc@gmail.com.  He blogs at HappyEMRDoctor.com and EHROutlook.com.

 

November 14, 2011 I Written By

Dr. West is an endocrinologist in private practice in Washington, DC. He completed fellowship training in Endocrinology and Metabolism at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Dr. West opened The Washington Endocrine Clinic, PLLC in 2009. He can be contacted at doctorwestindc@gmail.com.

Finally broke for an iPad

Ok, so I finally broke down and bought the little devil, despite my hesitations earlier in the year.  Lowest memory possible – 16 GB — but did get the WiFi-3G combo.  I figured I will just need to get one and dwell for a while in order to figure out it’s real pluses and minuses.  I’m sure it will be a lot of fun to own and use, but my hesitations were based on how useful it would be for the purposes of what I do most of on a daily basis, that is:  EMR use, research and blogging.  (Not that my schedule is letting me do much blogging lately!)  I’d like to get used to blogging using a touchscreen rather than a keyboard.

Two things I’ve noticed so far.  First, I can’t use my EMR system, Practice Fusion, since there is no flash capability on the iPad, short of jailbreaking the device to add an app that will allow it to play flash media.  There is a logmein app that one can get from Apple’s App Store for $30, but this requires you to run the EMR from another computer.  There’s also a company that makes an iPad app for PF, but I’ve heard that you have to buy the service for a $100 monthly ongoing fee, so no fun there.  Incidentally, I don’t think that this is PF has anything to be ashamed of.  I think that Apple should have considered adding flash capability given the state of computer technology in 2011 and the fact that this is a pretty standard way of communicating media over an internet connection.  What was Apple thinking?

Second, the WordPress GUI has the option for blogging in Visual or HTML mode (when you’re on a “computer” computer).  Who really wants to blog in HTML mode these days?  I’m actually surprised that little things like flash and visual interfaces for blogging can make such a difference in the user’s end experience.  In a way, it’s kind of like going back in time a few years to the days of Windows 95 and having to know HTML language.   At the time, it was a way rad and revolutionary concept, but now… meh.  I’m sure with time, I will find little backdoors and other ways of doing things on the iPad that make life easier.  Jailbreak anyone?  :-)

Dr. West is an endocrinologist in private practice in Washington, DC.  He completed fellowship training in Endocrinology and Metabolism at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and opened The Washington Endocrine Clinic, PLLC, as a solo practice in 2009.  He can be reached at doctorwestindc@gmail.com.  He blogs at HappyEMRDoctor.com and EHROutlook.com.

November 7, 2011 I Written By

Dr. West is an endocrinologist in private practice in Washington, DC. He completed fellowship training in Endocrinology and Metabolism at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Dr. West opened The Washington Endocrine Clinic, PLLC in 2009. He can be contacted at doctorwestindc@gmail.com.

Are More Doctors Leaving Medicare?

Today’s blog is a bit of a departure from my usual EMR and EHR focus, but I think that Medicare is pretty intricately intertwined with the EMR incentives via Meaningful Use, and so I thought I would share some perspective on a recent article that set my mind’s hamster wheel spinning.

Bob Keaveney’s article at Physicians Practice, With Friends Like These… paints a powerful summary to the reason doctors are running from Medicare and Medicaid — left and right — these days and how the New World Order coming in the form a ACOs may put a strain on the relationships between physicians and patients.

Last Tuesday evening, my practice manager was visiting with a freindly neighborhood PCP and her practice manager from down the road.  They are literally a block up as a matter of fact.  My manager was helping them understand how we use our EMR system, Practice Fusion, and how they could do the same.

The conversation at one point turned to why we were seeing a lot of Medicare patient referrals for diabetes care from the PCP’s father earlier this year.  Her father is also a PCP in the same practice here in DC.  She had an interesting answer.  “Oh, he left Medicare and had to find a home for them.  I’m also planning to leave Medicare in January 2012,” she said.  And to think that we just dumped Medicare ourselves on July 1!

Another interesting part in considering this PCP’s story of leaving Medicare in January is that she is probably not planning on going after Meaningful Use incentive money, an idea that I’ve nearly given up on as well given the complexities involved, in particular, to my current situation.  But that’s a completely different story for a different day.  At any rate, read Bob’s article above.  It’s food for a hungry mind as the year in Meaningful Use progresses.

Dr. West is an endocrinologist in private practice in Washington, DC.  He completed fellowship training in Endocrinology and Metabolism at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and opened The Washington Endocrine Clinic, PLLC, as a solo practice in 2009.  He can be reached at doctorwestindc@gmail.com.  Some of his blogs also appear at EHROutlook.com.

October 3, 2011 I Written By

Dr. West is an endocrinologist in private practice in Washington, DC. He completed fellowship training in Endocrinology and Metabolism at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Dr. West opened The Washington Endocrine Clinic, PLLC in 2009. He can be contacted at doctorwestindc@gmail.com.

Oops, Practice Fusion Did It Again

What’s $6 million more amongst friends?  Practice Fusion recently released their latest meteoric-rise statistics in funds raised per the lovely venture capitalists of the world.  Check out Electronic Medical Records Service Practice Fusion Raises $6M From SV Angel, Founders Fund And Others.

On a side note, at my office here in DC, I saw an interesting patient this past week referred over from Bethesda Physicians, PC.  Not so interesting from the standpoint of her issue, but much more interesting from the standpoint that her records included a note from her PCP… wait for it… written in Practice Fusion!!!  I’ve been waiting for the day that, here in DC, I am now starting to get referrals from other offices using Practice Fusion.  So cool to see that familiar note formatting coming in from someone else for a change.  We get phone calls all the time from other offices, asking us how we like PF — and even have a visiting doctor and her practice manager coming over in person next week — but this is the first time to see another office right up the road using it.

Practice Fusion should be very proud.  They are starting to take off in the DC Metro area.  Quick, someone make a coverage map, like they do for cell phone companies!

Dr. West is an endocrinologist in private practice in Washington, DC.  He completed fellowship training in Endocrinology and Metabolism at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and opened The Washington Endocrine Clinic, PLLC, as a solo practice in 2009.  He can be reached at doctorwestindc@gmail.com.

September 23, 2011 I Written By

Dr. West is an endocrinologist in private practice in Washington, DC. He completed fellowship training in Endocrinology and Metabolism at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Dr. West opened The Washington Endocrine Clinic, PLLC in 2009. He can be contacted at doctorwestindc@gmail.com.

Realities of Drug Ads in Free EHR, EMR

A while back, John Lynn wrote an interesting post considering drug ads and their part in free EMR business models, e-Detailing and Pharmacy Ads and Free EHR Software.  As a practicing provider who sees and treats around 20 patients daily, I have never had time to, and generally don’t care to, read the pharmaceutical ads in my EMR system (Practice Fusion).  There is really no chance of educating me about drug specifics, and probably 99% of doctors, this way.  Most doctors nowadays either Google search or search an online medical reference such as UpToDate.com for a drug that they want to know more about, typically as a patient visit unfolds or shortly thereafter.  I do my searches when the patient is right in the room with me in order to save time, and they seem to enjoy knowing that I’m being thorough in making sure I’m giving them the right information.

Now:

Do I admit to occasionally seeing the name of the drugs flashed ever so briefly before my eyes when the ads first appear peripherally in the screen margins?

Yes.

Could I name a few such drugs now, upon thinking back?

Sure.

Have they influenced my prescribing patterns?

Nope, not at all.

So how do I get my information about new drugs otherwise?  In the same old-fashi0ned, traditional way that doctors have been getting their drug information for years.  It’s those beloved, unauditable, private conversations over lunches, which are always on the drug company reps.  Let me tell you, free food goes an awful long way for a hungry doctor and his hard-working staff.

Dr. West is an endocrinologist in private practice in Washington, DC.  He completed fellowship training in Endocrinology and Metabolism at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and opened The Washington Endocrine Clinic, PLLC, as a solo practice in 2009.  He can be reached at doctorwestindc@gmail.com.

September 20, 2011 I Written By

Dr. West is an endocrinologist in private practice in Washington, DC. He completed fellowship training in Endocrinology and Metabolism at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Dr. West opened The Washington Endocrine Clinic, PLLC in 2009. He can be contacted at doctorwestindc@gmail.com.

EMRs, EHRs Should Generate Easy to Read Notes

I had an interesting phone call last week from an ENT doctor who had received my office note for a patient and wanted to run his proposal for surgery by me before proceeding.  The patient in discussion needs a thyroid surgery for a suspicious appearing nodule, and the surgeon and I both agreed that due to the other nodules present the patient should have a complete, as opposed to partial, thyroidectomy.

Then he moved on to asking me about my EMR system, Practice Fusion, and how I liked it.  After sharing a lot of information (okay, I talked his ear off, it’s hard not to when you’ve evolved a lot over a relatively short time, relatively speaking and are excited about your progress), we then moved back to to why he was asking about my EMR in the first place.

He liked the format of the note I sent to him and wanted to know more about what it was like for me to use it in my practice.  Specifically, he liked that my note appeared like an authentically-written note that a human doctor put thought into rather than something a nonhuman computer spit out after clicking off some check boxes.  He mirrored exactly what I have always personally felt.  I want to generate notes that reflect well on me personally and the training I received at places like the University of Pennsylvania and Johns Hopkins.  But, no matter where one received one’s training, as long as a good training has been received, you want to look like a good doctor to your peers.  Forget what the patients think in this case.  They’re not going to be the ones not referring you more patients, if you’re a subspecialist, or the subspecialists not referring their patients to you (if you’re a PCP) when the patient is looking for a new primary care doctor.  Whether this concern has any validity or is purely psychological remains to be seen.

But even more to my point, many doctors are already demoralized enough into feeling like McDonald’s workers in a system overrun with never-ending patients and the pressure to see as many as possible.  Giving them McDonald’s quality EMR systems that generate notes difficult to look at – on many levels — is a bad approach.

Dr. West is an endocrinologist in private practice in Washington, DC.  He completed fellowship training in Endocrinology and Metabolism at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and opened The Washington Endocrine Clinic, PLLC, as a solo practice in 2009.  He can be reached at doctorwestindc@gmail.com.

September 9, 2011 I Written By

Dr. West is an endocrinologist in private practice in Washington, DC. He completed fellowship training in Endocrinology and Metabolism at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Dr. West opened The Washington Endocrine Clinic, PLLC in 2009. He can be contacted at doctorwestindc@gmail.com.

Latest Practice Fusion Stats Continue to Skyrocket

Just thought I would share with my readers the continued phenomenal climb in users and patients served by my EMR, EHR provider, Practice Fusion.  They continue to impress the heck out of me in terms of their user number, which is now over 100,000 users strong.  They reportedly add to this over 500 per day and 10,000 per month.  The patient count is now up to 16,000,000 apparently.  Considering there are about 312,000,000 citizens in the US population, that’s about 5.1%.  Quoting from the above link, “the company started the year with 55,000 users (82% increase) and 6 million patients (166% increase).”

Just remember that a while ago I predicted that Practice Fusion would be the next Gmail and that eventually every doctor would eventually have an account.  Looks like my prediction may be coming true.  No wonder venture capitalists like Peter Thiel have been pumping in the dollars.

Dr. West is an endocrinologist in private practice in Washington, DC.  He completed fellowship training in Endocrinology and Metabolism at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Dr. West opened The Washington Endocrine Clinic, PLLC, as a solo practice in 2009.  He can be reached at doctorwestindc@gmail.com.

August 26, 2011 I Written By

Dr. West is an endocrinologist in private practice in Washington, DC. He completed fellowship training in Endocrinology and Metabolism at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Dr. West opened The Washington Endocrine Clinic, PLLC in 2009. He can be contacted at doctorwestindc@gmail.com.

EMR Development, Where are the Doctors?

John Lynn, over at EMRandEHR.com recently wondered about Depth in an EMR Conference.  He recently attended the Health Tech Next Generation conference in San Francisco, where few doctors seemed to be present.  This is such a classic blunder in health IT: not checking with the end users to make sure what you are designing is on the right track.  To be honest, it’s what killed our first EMR experience and led us to fire the EMR vendor.  There was no clearly tangible evidence that a medical doctor was involved at all in programming the thing.  We felt like we were beta testing their system for them as they worked out “bugs” based on our suggestions.  Frankly, we should have requested three months worth of consulting fees in the end, but that’s a story for another time.

John also made the comment that he had never seen a true EMR conference focused on doctors, practice managers, and actual users of the EMR.  Hmm… I think Practice Fusion Connect 2010 did this to a large extent.  Lots of pics and videos from the event can be found here.  Better yet, I’ve already scheduled time to go the next one, Practice Fusion Connect 2011, which is being held in SF on 11.11.11.  It’s slated to be about  five times bigger this year according to my inside sources at the company, and they are expecting about 1,000 attendees.  When I was there in 2010, it seemed heavily focused on the end users, who seemed to make up a large portion of the audience.

John mentioned the important and puzzling question of “how do you get enough doctors together at an EMR conference?”  I’ll admit that one’s a tough nut to crack, since you are asking private practice docs to give up income to get to a conference during a weekday, on which most conferences like this are held.  If it’s held on a Saturday or over a weekend, that might help.  If the target audience is employed and salaried, then it’s not as much of a problem getting them there since they aren’t really losing any pay/income.  The problem with that is: employed docs generally don’t make buying and implementing decisions.  Those of us who do, typically are in small practices of our own.  An interesting conundrum to solve, but bring it on.  More conferences like this are definitely needed since American healthcare runs on private practice doctors, their managers, and their staff.

Dr. West is an endocrinologist in private practice in Washington, DC.  He completed fellowship training in Endocrinology and Metabolism at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Dr. West opened The Washington Endocrine Clinic, PLLC, as a solo practice in 2009.  He can be reached at doctorwestindc@gmail.com.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

August 15, 2011 I Written By

Dr. West is an endocrinologist in private practice in Washington, DC. He completed fellowship training in Endocrinology and Metabolism at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Dr. West opened The Washington Endocrine Clinic, PLLC in 2009. He can be contacted at doctorwestindc@gmail.com.

Practice Fusion in DC for summit on interoperability

Recently had the pleasure of spending a great night out with our friends Emily Peters and Tom McMennamin at Practice Fusion.  After serving 22 patients in a very busy day for us yesterday, we had a blast at Ris since E & T were in town for a local conference to discuss the importance of EMR and EHR interoperability with major government institutions.  Various government reps were present for this two-day extravaganza of the minds, including those from the Social Security Administration.  Turns out that PF is working on developing many things, including a bridge to communicate important medical records electronically to the SSA efficiently when patients apply for disability benefits support.  I’ve completed two such requests for records recently in the past two weeks and it’s currently all on paper.  What a pain and how inefficient!

After a long first day at the conference, Emily and Tom were still alive and bursting with energy enough to meet up with several local area docs and practice managers to discuss the latest and greatest updates.  We got to ooh and ahh at all the progress in Practice Fusion’s ongoing meteoric rise over the past several years.  They are now around 100 employees and will be moving into a fantastic new larger space in San Francisco within the next few months to better accommodate their mission to provide a great EHR, EMR system with top-notch interoperability.  Go PF!

Dr. West is an endocrinologist in private practice in Washington, DC.  He completed fellowship training in Endocrinology and Metabolism at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Dr. West opened The Washington Endocrine Clinic, PLLC, as a solo practice in 2009.  He can be reached at doctorwestindc@gmail.com.

August 10, 2011 I Written By

Dr. West is an endocrinologist in private practice in Washington, DC. He completed fellowship training in Endocrinology and Metabolism at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Dr. West opened The Washington Endocrine Clinic, PLLC in 2009. He can be contacted at doctorwestindc@gmail.com.